Craft Your Personal Purpose and Define Your Career Path

Craft Your Personal Purpose and Define Your Career Path

Craft Your Personal Purpose and Define Your Career Path

The privilege of a lifetime is to become who you truly are      -Carl Jung

Don’t let your ADHD or other challenges keep you back from a life of purpose and a career you love.   Start to define your own personal purpose with this guide and create, what you want from your life despite your struggles.

Why Define Your Purpose?

When you act without purpose, you risk being reactive instead of proactive. This means that instead of consciously making the decisions that lead to the life you want, you simply react to what falls into your lap.

You can create a proactive life – one where you consciously determine your likes, dislikes, goals, and plans to reach those goals – by learning about yourself, and applying your self-knowledge to your career decisions.

We are all a combination of our genetic traits, like innate skills and talents, and our personal history and experiences.

Personal history includes our expectations, what we are familiar with, and what seems realistic or unrealistic to us. For example, if you grew up around doctors, you might see it as realistic to become a doctor yourself; but if you had no family members or family friends who were doctors growing up, then becoming a doctor might seem out of reach.

This expectation has nothing to do with your innate potential.

These learned attitudes can hold us back from pursuing careers that are well-suited to our goals. That’s why it is so important to consciously analyze what you enjoy, and what you want out of a career – and then investigate which careers will allow you to best fulfill your purpose.

By defining your personal purpose and learning about yourself, you’ll give yourself goals to strive for and tools to engage with the challenges and curveballs of life head on!

When you live with purpose, you become passionate about living. You are in touch with your drives and passions, and have a purpose you’ve chosen to keep you focused and motivated. To start making the most of your life, the first step is to create this personal purpose.

A Good Place to Start: Investigate Your Inner Narrative

Below, I’ve listed some questions to help you identify your passions. Spend some time with these questions to get into the headspace of paying attention to your own joys and strengths, with a sharp eye out for why these things make you happy. These are only a few of the questions that can help you to see the patterns of what brings you joy, what stresses you out, and what you are really good at.

To get the most out of these questions, please answer them honestly.

  • What motivates me in life?
  • What have I wanted, but never gotten, in life?
  • What energizes me? How?
  • What brings me the most joy? Why?
  • What are my biggest interests?
  • What do I REALLY REALLY want in life?
  • Who do I enjoy being around? Why?

Now, how can you turn these loves and desires into a statement of purpose for the next several years of your life?

Is there a passion, skill, or craft that you want to devote your life to perfecting? Is there an area of study that you want to devote your life to advancing? Is building wealth your top priority? Or is there a type of challenge you’d like to devote your life to helping others overcome?

There are countless possible answers, but some could look like this:

  • My purpose in life is to help end world hunger.
  • My purpose in life is to help people look and feel their best.
  • My purpose in life is to empower others through education.
  • My purpose in life is to care for the sick.
  • My purpose in life is to become an artist whose work moves people.
  • My purpose in life is to change laws and policies to create a better world.
  • My purpose in life is to build as much wealth as possible for my family in future generations.

Consider which way of contributing might suit you best. For example, are you a people person, or do you prefer to work alone? Do you like to do hands-on work, or do you prefer to study and work out theories?

Consider these possible professions that correspond with the type of life purpose:

  • A person could help end world hunger by being a scientist, a politician, or a founder or employee of an organization devoted to hunger relief.
  • A person could help others to look and feel their best as a fitness trainer, a cosmetologist, a nutritionist, or a fashion designer.
  • A person could empower others through education as a school teacher, a founder or staff member of an adult or extracurricular education program, or a producer of educational media.

Note that even within each of these purposes, many different careers requiring different skills are necessary to fulfill them.   Defining your personal purpose helps you choose your life goals, and possible career paths to reach them!

To read more about finding your passion career, purchase my book

Happiness + Passion + Purpose Book A Step By Step Guide On How To Nourish The Patterns Of Your Life Into The Job You Will Love And Land It!

 

 

The Under Used Tactic to Land a Job: Informational Interviewing

The Under Used Tactic to Land a Job: Informational Interviewing

 

Informational interviewing might just be the best way to get a job and yet it is underused by most job seekers.  Whenever I work with a career development client and we get to the informational interviewing step, I am met with hesitance and  resistance. I get it!  Cold calling is a scary and dreaded way to talk to a potential employer, but it is so effective!

Really, the problem is that  It is misunderstood and overlooked as a means to get a foot in the door for a job.  

Think of an information interview meeting as a networking opportunity. This is a one-on-one meeting with a key person in a field that you have a high interest in.

It may be that you have preconceived ideas about a particular career. Information interviewing can give you a better sense of what it would be like to work in the field you’ve chosen. It is first-hand, realistic, information you can use to form your idea of your ideal career.

An informational interview is less formal than a real interview. It allows you the opportunity to show off your personality, your skills, interests, and aptitude in a semi-relaxed atmosphere. Because of this, you will likely come across as more authentic to the interviewer. An informational interview gives a prospective employer better insight into who you are, and how you might be a good fit for the organization in the near future. This is a win-win situation for everyone.

“Foot in the door”

At the typical interview that follows an application, you might feel that you’re in an interview mill—the interviewer bored with all the candidates and simply saying, “Next. Next,” after each interview. This may leave you feeling less than confident in your ability to outperform the next person. With an information interview, you aren’t going to be competing for a time slot, and chances are the interviewer has 15-20 minutes they can carve out of their busy day to talk shop. Many people enjoy this opportunity to talk about themselves, and about how they got to where they are, as well as to help young job-seekers find a springboard from which to launch their careers.

Because informational interviews are less formal—and stressful—the conversations usually flow easier.   Remember, you aren’t there to ask for a job. You’re only there to learn. You want information that will help guide you in the direction of the career best suited for YOU. This means you are the one in control of the questions and the outcome of the interview. This is a great time to let your guard down a little, let your true personality shine, as well as briefly showcase how your skills benefit the company. You can also take the opportunity to ask more strategic questions—questions that help you, but perhaps would not be appropriate at a real interview. You can ask about benefits, salary, and even the social climate of the organization without portraying yourself in a negative light.

Gain insight, and Practice Interviewing

This is the opportunity for you to come in prepared to ask the right questions. People enjoy telling their story and you can get a real sense of what the company or career might be like, and so determine whether your chosen career is truly a good fit for you.

Additionally, if some parts of the interview process intimidate you, this is an excellent way to come up with a game-plan and practice. Remember practice ONLY makes for improvement.

Mentorship

If you feel a connection with the person you meet with, you may well have lucked into a mentoring relationship opportunity. Your interviewer might really be impressed with the initiative you show by requesting an informational interview, and may be willing to offer further advice and support. And this goes both ways. Because of the rapport you build in this interview, you yourself might ask for further guidance via follow ups which we’ll talk about later in this chapter.

How to conduct yourself at the interview

  • You should regard each interview as a business appointment and conduct yourself in a professional manner.
  • Write a THANK YOU NOTE to the people you have interviewed. Report back to them if you have followed up on any suggestions.

The last thing to remember is that informational interviews are extremely effective. How effective? According to Dr. Randall Hansen, founder of Quintessential Careers, one of the oldest and most comprehensive career development sites on the web, “While one out of every 200 resumes (some studies put the number as high as 1,500 resumes) results in a job offer, one out of every 12 informational interviews results in a job offer.”

Informational Interviews are so effective that despite that the stated aim is NOT to get a job, many  Informational Interviews still end up with a job offer.

So, go ahead and pick up that phone, you may just land a job!

To read more about interviewing, resumes and finding your passion career, purchase my book

Happiness + Passion + Purpose Book A Step By Step Guide On How To Nourish The Patterns Of Your Life Into The Job You Will Love And Land It!